floating plant

Duck Weed

Duckweed tend to be associated with fertile, even eutrophic conditions. They can be spread by waterfowl and small mammals, transported inadvertently on their feet and bodies as well as by moving water. Duckweed is an important high-protein food source for waterfowl and also is eaten by humans in some parts of the world as it contains more protein than soybeans.The tiny plants provide shelter cover for many aquatic species. The plants are capable of absorbing excess mineral nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphates. Duckweed prefer high-nutrient wetland environments, such as sloughs. Often mistaken for algae on a pond. Scoop up some of the plant and if you see tiny little roots – its duckweed.

FROG BIT (hydrocharis morsus-ranae)

This plant is on the Prohibited Invasive Species list in Alberta. Hydrocharis morsus-ranae spreads rapidly by way of long, cord-like stolons, easily giving rise to a floating mat of interconnected plants. It is capable of over-wintering by forming vegetative buds, called turions, located at the base of the plant.  Hydrocharis morsus-ranae has rapid vegetative spread and the ability to form dense mats, which can limit light penetration and fill the water column in shallow areas. In doing so it can strongly affect native aquatic life. It can also inhibit boat traffic and limit recreational activities.

Parrot feather (Myriophyllum Brasiliensis)

  • Hardiness: 5-11
  • Height: 6″ – 12″
  • Foliage: Small leaves in whorls; aerial foliage have a deeper blue-green color, red stems
  • Comments: Often used in aquariums as an oxygenator; submerged plant but will root and develop aerial foliage in shallow water;
  • obtains nutrients directly from water; soil planting not necessary
  • The larger variety Myriophyllum Aquaticum can become invasive and is being removed from many suppliers availability list.